Turnaround Investing Blog

George Putnam, one of the country's leading turnaround and distressed investing professionals, shares his timely insight on the economy and turnaround investing opportunities.

Automobiles & Components / Post-Bankruptcy Stocks

How Will the Recall Issue Affect GM Stock?

Because General Motors is currently the subject of many negative headlines arising from a significant recall relating to ignition switches, we wondered what long-term effect the recall would have on GM’s stock. Our best guess is “very little.”

As contrarian investors, we like to “buy on bad news.” We’ve looked at a number of product liability issues over the years, going back as far as the exploding gas tanks on Ford Pintos in the 1970’s. Our general conclusion is that once the negative headlines subside, even major product liability issues have little long-term effect on stock price. The one major exception has been for asbestos-related liabilities, which usually have a devastating effect on the company’s common stock.

We decided to test that conclusion with a relatively recent example. In late 2009 and early 2010 Toyota issued a series of recalls relating to sticking accelerator pedals. Just this past week, Toyota agreed to pay a $1.2 billion fine to the U.S. government arising from the accelerator issue--and that is on top of a $1.1 billion class action settlement with private litigants late last year.

So what happened to the Toyota stock? From the end of February 2010 (which is the month after the recalls peaked) to March 25, 2014, Toyota stock has gained 45%. This compares to a gain of 31% for Ford stock and virtually no gain for Honda stock over the same period. 

Obviously, many factors affect a stock’s long-term performance, but our conclusion is that liability relating to recalls or other product defect issues usually isn’t one of them. As a result, we think the recent dip in the price of GM stock could be a buying opportunity.

Read More Distressed Investing Blog Entries

Identify & Profit from Distressed Investing

Free Report: Turnaround Investing Mistakes

Turnaround Investing Blog

Turnaround Investing Blog

Turnaround Investing Philosophy: 32 Years Later, Some Things Never Change

Recently I was asked how my investing perspective changed over the 32 years of publishing The Turnaround Letter. It's a fascinating question because change is constant, and often beneficial (although that's not a given) in the business world. If change is the norm, can investing principles stay constant? I firmly believe that they can. Read More.

EV/EBITDA: What Is It & Why Are We Using It More?

In reading recent editions of The Turnaround Letter, you have probably noticed that we are increasingly using EV/EBITDA as a valuation measure, rather than the better-known price/earnings multiple.  We thought it might be useful to describe this measure and why we like it.

Read More.

Turnaround Letter Stock Pick Named Top Performer of 2017

 

stock market advicex

 

What Last Year's Top Stock Pickers Are Buying in 2018

 

This Forbes write-up follows up on the recent Top Stock Tips report--naming The Turnaround Letter's Crocs recommendation the top performer of 2017: With 90% gains, CROX beat out 100 other investment ideas included in the report; and the stock continues to have value investing appeal, according to Putnam.

 

George notes, "We see additional upside for the stock in 2018 as management's efforts continue to bear fruit, though the gains will likely be more muted than we saw in 2017."