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Bear Market

A bear market is one in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment to be self-sustaining. As investors anticipate losses in a bear market and selling continues, pessimism only grows. Although there is no strict definition of a bear market, a downturn of 20% or more in multiple broad market indexes, such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) or Standard & Poor's 500 Index (S&P 500), over at least a two-month period is often considered to be a bear market. A bear market should not be confused with a correction, which is a short-term trend that has a duration of less than two months.

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Learn George Putnam's Turnaround Secrets

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Turnaround Investing Blog

Turnaround Investing Blog

How To Find Good Value Stocks When They Are Scarce

With U.S. stocks well into their eighth year of a bull marketĀ and the economy showing increasing signs of strength, finding ideal turnaround stocks--those with all three ingredients--can be a needle-in-the-haystack project at best. What is an investor to do in a seemingly barren value stock landscape? Read More.

Market-Beating Profit: The 200+ Club

Turnaround stocks present a unique opportunity for savvy investors to buy in at bargain prices. Take a look at this list of just a few of our purchase recommendations that have realized a return rate of 200% or better:

200+ Club: Value Investing Stock Profits with 200% or Better Return

* Bristow remains in our active portfolio (currently as a Hold), and 2,849% gain is as of 1/17/17.

Bet on These Battered Stocks

Battered Stocks/Tribune Logo: Value Investing from The Turnaround Letter Highlighted in the Chicago Tribune

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Chicago Tribune highlighted this Kiplinger's Money Power write-up on George's contrarian investing approach and The Turnaround Letter's April 2016 monthly turnaround stock pick.

 

Darren Fonda notes, "…besieged stocks often start to recuperate as the headlines fade and investors anticipate a return to precrisis sales and profits. The trick, of course, is to find companies that are more likely to rebound from a setback than collapse entirely."

 

Learn more about Putnam's turnaround investing strategy.